America’s Barns are WORTH SAVING
but are being destroyed every single day

America’s barns made this nation prosper. Barns protected livestock and pioneer families who often shared the barn until a house could be built.

As the nation grew, so did its variety of barns. These architectural treasures are physical history books of ethnicity, lifestyle, agriculture, simplicity or elegance, natural resources and human resourcefulness . If barns could speak, we would hear stories of pride, prayer and perseverance. Stories of laughter and love, triumphs and tears.

America’s earliest barns – and those dating into the early 1900s, were built from virgin forests. They are increasingly rare, being destroyed when maintenance, wise reuse, even relocation could give them another century of life. When these barns are gone – they are lost forever.

Barn Aid Series

The National Trust for Historic Preservation and Successful Farming Magazine

These booklets were first published as part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s BARN AGAIN! program (in collaboration with Successful Farming magazine) in the 1990s. Reproduced in digital format with permission for free personal download, monetary calculations are outdated and no longer accurate , however the basics of making decisions and taking action to save heritage barns remain valid and valuable. Other excellent barn repair reference materials available for download include Ohio State University Extension “Fact Sheets” on rehabilitation, economic incentives, and hiring a contractor. (www.ohioline.osu.edu)

When scavengers are allowed access to barns, waste and loss are hastened. Protect our heritage barns!
When scavengers are allowed access to barns, waste and loss are hastened. Protect our heritage barns!
A hand-hewn framed barn rots from neglect.
Vines tear at siding, gradually pulling a timber-frame barn to the ground.
Early 1800s log barn. GONE.
This barn was lost to neglect. It could have had a long life serving a new purpose.
This barn was lost to neglect. It could have had a long life serving a new purpose.
Hand-hewn barn near Grand Rapids. Burned by a developer along with a larger barn just across the road.
Relocated to Michigan from another state, a historic barn is now a winery.
Loved and maintained by their owners, these barns live on!
Saved!! (See next image.)
Saved!!
Very much loved! New roof!
When the front right corner of the foundation gave way, the owners said there was no way they could let their barn die. Repairs were made. Saved!